Academic Inflation

UFT88 Read at Sheffield Hallam University

March 26, 2017

Sheffield Hallam is ranked 781 by webometrics and 801+ by Times. It has 31,485 students and was founded as a School of Design in 1843, becoming a university in 1992. So it is one of the new universities. UFT88 is a famous paper that corrects the second Bianchi identity of 1902 for torsion. It has been read in about two hundred and fifty of the best unversities in the world in the past two or three years, and leads in to the post Einsteinian paradigm shift in which the old gravitational physics is replaced by ECE2 theory. As can be seen from my university analysis of the last two or three days, combined sites www.aias.us and www.upitec.org are read continuously at all the best universities in every region of the world.”

There was a time when British university education was the envy of the world. The brightest children of parents of modest means could attend university, with all of their tuition fees and living expenses being met entirely by their home town. The increasingly impoverished UK government then decreed that all of those expenses had to be met by the students themselves. Whether this was really done as a money-grubbing scheme, or whether the government was embarrassed by the relatively small percentage of university graduates in the population is unclear. This magic-wand waving did not however instantly increase the number of candidates who could in fact pass the existing entry tests. And so, in a second round of wand-waving, the entry qualifications were systematically lowered. There remained one more problem: a shortage of universities to accommodate the resultant glut of second-rate students. A third wave of the wand then turned all of the ‘polytechnics’ and ‘technical colleges’ into universities literally overnight. These colleges had done a good job of turning out people who sought a vocation rather than a profession: the courses had ranged all the way down to hairdressing and the qualifications offered rarely exceeded a Higher National Diploma. Were the staff-members sacked and replaced by university-level educators? Were they ****! The very same lecturers now found themselves teaching degree-level courses. It is said that the newly-elevated lecturers at some of the new ‘universities’ immediately set about designing fancy academic garb for themselves. Another side-effect was that the number of professors, a previously rare post (perhaps one per department), suddenly exploded. The net result of all of this devaluation has literally been a joke. The joke being: “What is the question most frequently asked by philosophy graduates in the 21st century?”  … “Do you want fries with that?”.  The point of this little digression is that, try as we might, when we read Sheffield-Hallam University we think Sheffield City Polytechnic. Elitist? Hell yes, what is the alternative?

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3 Responses to “Academic Inflation”

  1. IoanRichard Says:

    I thought there was a University on the corner of the street where I live, with the world’s most famous Science Professor as its resident Chair.
    Oh, and by the way, for public information, the Public Services Ombudsman has just REJECTED all the complaints he made against me, but he has not heralded that within his Science Fiction postings BLOG.
    I am now told he has donated copies of his books to the County Library where they are housed in the “Community History Collection” not the Science Text Books Section. Is that fair for the local history researchers? It seems fair anyway for serious young Science Students. What says you Crackpotwatch?

    • crackpotwatch Says:

      It will pose a problem for our author-friend: his donation will certainly end up in the science book section … but there it will not be consumed by the history fans, who will be in desperate need of an antidote.

  2. Harry Hab Says:

    Also, they are nationally on the same salary scales, so these sh*t-for-brains who have been allowed to style themselves “full professor” certainly get paid as if they’re the real thing.

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